Brand history & Archives

Kabuki, kyogen, noh, traditional theater

June 18, 2021

NIPPON TIMES MAGAZINE, JULY 20, 1946
Oct. 21, 1931 The Art of “No”
The “No”, Japan’s Ancient Drama, Is Unique in the World

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Dec. 27, 1931
One of the Greatest Kabuki Actors Enacts a Role in Which He Excels: Onoe Kikugoro.
In the part of Togashi In Kanjincho, Recently Presented At One of the Leading Kabuki Theaters In the Capital. The Character Togashi In the Play Is an Official At One of the Barrier Stations During the Time of Yoritomo.
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Jul. 20, 1946 Actors and the Kabuki Today
Photo: Koshiro as Benkei in the famous Kabuki drama Kanjincho
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Oct. 5, 1946 Bunraku
Introducing the history of Bunraku as a Japanese marionette show

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Sept. 22, 1958 Classic Drama of Noh, Kyogen
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Mar. 18, 1970 Ancient Arts Survive Despite Inroads of Modern Trends
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Sept. 02, 2007 Destined to act wild
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Jan. 05, 1967 Advertisement for Grand Kabuki
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Oct. 10, 2004 An Ebizo XI is born
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The theatrical arts are perhaps one of the most enduring traditions of Japan, and from the mid-20th century, The Japan Times has showcased the stories and the stars of the stage, from kabuki and noh to rakugo and kyogen.

In the 1940s and ’50s, Maj. Faubion Bowers, who wrote features explaining the context of Japanese theater on numerous occasions for The Japan Times, had a major effect in preserving traditional theatrical arts’ place on the world stage. As Gen.

Douglas MacArthur’s personal Japanese translator, he was able to convince the Occupation forces not to ban kabuki performances, which were thought to be promoting feudal-era values.

Until the present day, The Japan Times has provided rare glimpses into the minds of theater masters, whose craft has been passed down through generations.